Jacob J. Walker's Blog

Scholarly Thoughts, Research, and Journalism for Informal Peer Review

Archive for the ‘Career Technical Education’ Category

Udacity is Guaranteeing Graduates will Get Jobs, is there a catch?

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I wrote recently about my thoughts on whether MOOCs have been a failure.  Udacity is showing that they are not, and is an example of where the potential of technology to “disrupt” a market is finally entering the realm of education.  And it has now put its “money where its mouth is”, by doing something no college (that I know of) has done: guarantee its graduates a job. But what is the catch (if there is one)?

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Written by Jacob Walker

January 15th, 2016 at 5:25 am

Why California Can and Should Immediately Allow Computer Science to be used as an alternative to Algebra I as a High School Graduation Requirement

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It is a given that the 21st century economy will be driven by information and communication technologies (ICT), in which nearly the entire human-created world that surrounds us will have a basis in computer science. And while our high schools require a graduate to know about the underlying structures of biological and physical sciences, there is no consistent requirement to understand the underlying structure of the information world. While groups and legislators have worked to make computer science, not just computer literacy, being a high school graduation requirement in California, this has not yet come to pass. And possibly it is not the best answer to the problem.   Instead, I’m going to suggest that a more appropriate solution, which can be implemented immediately, is to have high schools allow an introductory Computer Science course to be used as a graduation requirement alternative to Algebra I.

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My Short Critique of the Common Core Math Standards

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I have not wanted to post too much about the Common Core until I had some time to learn more about it, think about it, etc.  So I’ve been sharing tidbits so far.  But I think it is time to share some of my critiques about the math standards, which I hope may filter into the next set of standards.

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Minesweeper as a Technician Training Tool

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A screenshot of Mines-Perfect, a close alternative for Windows XP's Minesweeper game. From Wikimedia Commons, picture by Dimitri Torterat, See Wikimedia Commons Page for Licensing Information: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Minesperfect_windowsxp.pngSince at least 2007, I have used winning the game Minesweeper as an assessment to determine whether adult students were ready to join technician training classes that I have taught.  And in 2010, I conducted a Minesweeper and Hypothetical Thinking Action Research & Pilot Study as my Master’s project, in which I found some initial indications that ones computer ability was correlated with their ability to play Minesweeper. (Although, the sample size of that pilot study was so small, it should not be considered as any form of proof)

And, as I prepare to start a new technician training program with Highlands Community Charter and Technical Schools, I am again using Minesweeper as a prerequisite assessment.

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Written by Jacob Walker

August 16th, 2014 at 6:46 am

Free Computer Science and Information Technology Training Opportunity

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On August 18, I am starting a small computer science and IT training program with Highlands Community Charter School, that will have no more than 10 students in it. This program is open to students who are 22 years of age, or older, and who don’t have a high school diploma.  Students must also have sufficient computer skills before entering the program, although, students who don’t yet have sufficient skills may join a self-paced IT Prep program with the school, to work up to joining the class.  This is a full-time program, where students go to school 6 hours per day for a full school year.

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Thought of the Day: Why Career Technical Teachers can make Extraordinary Academic Teachers

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link between education and the work worldFor the past several days I’ve been posting about the discrimination against Career Technical Education teachers in California, and some solutions to this problem, and yesterday explained how CTE teachers can be recognized as being Highly Qualified by the standards started with “No Child Left Behind”.

And while all of this clearly affects the teachers involved, I want to make clear that this discrimination dramatically affects our children’s future, and hence our nation’s future.

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Written by Jacob Walker

July 13th, 2014 at 11:59 am

Thought of the Day: CTE Teachers can be Highly Qualified in Core Academic Subjects

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One other hurdle that CTE teachers have to teaching academic subjects, beyond the misunderstanding of what their credential allows, and also the bad policy of not allowing them to gain supplementary authorizations, is that many administrators and CTE teachers may not realize that California Designated Subjects credential holders can be recognized as “Highly Qualified” by federal/state standards, which originally came from No Child Left Behind.  (I should note my personal opinion that the Highly Qualified designation or lack thereof does not necessarily mean one truly is qualified or not, as it is clear that there are many Type I and Type II errors that can occur, but none the less, getting this designation is an important legality for schools to keep federal funding.)

UPDATE: Since writing this original post, I have discovered that in California CTE teachers who are teaching applied academics are automatically considered Highly Qualified, as I will be posting about soon.   But for anyone who is interested in knowing more about how to potentially get the Highly Qualified designation, I have kept this article online.

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Written by Jacob Walker

July 12th, 2014 at 11:56 am

Thought of the Day: Solving California CTE Teacher Discrimination

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Yesterday, I posted about the clear discrimination that occurs with Career Technical Education (CTE) teachers in California.  Today, I want to talk a little more about solutions to the problem, as I’m not usually the type of person to just whine about something.  Further, I suspect that most administrators and academic teachers don’t even realize that they are discriminating.

There are two solutions that can help alleviate this problem.

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Written by Jacob Walker

July 11th, 2014 at 6:04 am

Thought of the Day: Discrimination against Career Technical Education Teachers

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In California, and probably in most other states, there is a clear discrimination that occurs against Career Technical Education, where CTE instructors and students are looked at as second class citizens.  While I will share more in the future about this broader problem, today I am going to focus on how the California’s Commission on Teacher Credentialing and School Districts discriminate against Career Technical Education teachers, and how with the loss of ROP, this has meant a huge number of layoffs to these teachers, and could mean a lot more losing their jobs, if this illegal discrimination doesn’t stop.

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Written by Jacob Walker

July 10th, 2014 at 11:59 am