Jacob J. Walker's Blog

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Archive for the ‘Political Science’ Category

Thought of the Day: “It is a well-known fact that those people who most want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it.”

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Image of a two headed Donald Trump

“It is a well-known fact that those people who most want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it.” – Douglas Adams

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Written by Jacob Walker

May 11th, 2016 at 11:59 am

Why Johnny Can’t Compute: The Failure of the Old Math

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Why Johnny Can't ComputeNearly every leader in our nation is saying that we need to have students get more STEM education (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), so that our country will not fall behind technologically and economically from the rest of the world. But, what they don’t say (possibly, because they don’t know), is that the type of math that is needed for Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and Computer Science (CS) is not the math that is normally taught in high school.

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I’ve been accepted into the University of South Africa! (Again…)

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After needing to wait a year, and recently going through a lot of bureaucratic systems (B.S. for short 🙂 , I have been accepted into the University of South Africa’s Doctor of Education program, focusing on comparative education (which focuses on comparing education systems throughout the world).  I’ve written about my proposed doctoral research before, but it is nice to know that the next major step towards completing the research is done.

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Written by Jacob Walker

December 11th, 2015 at 6:01 pm

I am saddened by the Killings in Paris from ISIS AND the Killings in the U.S. from ourselves

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Yesterday there was mass murder in Paris, as I am sure most of you know.  There was also at least one murder in Sacramento, as it happened a little over a block away from where I was at school.   Although it is in some news sources, the murder of the Grant football player hasn’t had nearly as much coverage.  And if it was just one death in our country by gangs and guns, while I’d still be sad, I would not be as outraged.  But it isn’t.

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Written by Jacob Walker

November 14th, 2015 at 11:59 am

Posted in Political Science

Why California Can and Should Immediately Allow Computer Science to be used as an alternative to Algebra I as a High School Graduation Requirement

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It is a given that the 21st century economy will be driven by information and communication technologies (ICT), in which nearly the entire human-created world that surrounds us will have a basis in computer science. And while our high schools require a graduate to know about the underlying structures of biological and physical sciences, there is no consistent requirement to understand the underlying structure of the information world. While groups and legislators have worked to make computer science, not just computer literacy, being a high school graduation requirement in California, this has not yet come to pass. And possibly it is not the best answer to the problem.   Instead, I’m going to suggest that a more appropriate solution, which can be implemented immediately, is to have high schools allow an introductory Computer Science course to be used as a graduation requirement alternative to Algebra I.

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How should we Engineer the Automated Economy?

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In my recent commencement address to the Sacramento Stride Center graduates, I talked about how truck driving is a good job now, but I worry it will be going away.   I am not alone in this concern, as a few days later, on “The Take Away” that I heard listening to NPR, there was a whole news story titled: Self-Driving Trucks Take to America’s Roads.

There is a bigger issue afoot from this: will we be slaves to the automation or will it set us free? Because without deliberate action in the shaping of our economy, economic forces could very well push us to complete monopolies in the means of production.  (Yes, I know you say that we already have government legal safe guards…  but the Citizens United ruling shows a trend towards eroding these to non-existence.)

The following are some proposals for shaping our economic system:

I will discuss each of these in future posts, but it is the last one that I believe would be best for society (as it is best for individuals), and that could be accomplished by strengthening some of the current trends.

Written by Jacob Walker

June 24th, 2015 at 11:59 am

Why I Think Twin River’s Current Special Election is Bad

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I believe there are times for special elections and recalls, but only when an individual has done something truly egregious, otherwise I agree with Bruce Maiman that generally special elections just waste tax payer dollars and lead to lower voter turnout.

Although, there have been times in the past that I supported a special election, such as work to remove Cortez Quinn.  But, I think the fact that he was ultimately convicted of a felony justifies thinking it would have been good to have a recall.  (Although the problem solved itself)

But, right now I see a huge waste of tax payer dollars  in the Twin Rivers Unified School District.  The special election is estimated to cost about $113,000.  This could pay for another teacher or two in Twin Rivers, or buy over 200 net books.  But instead, the political forces of California have rammed through a special election to work to get an “up and coming” Democrat into an office.  And while I tend to vote for Democrats, this is just so clearly politically motivated, and not about the kids, I am a bit sick.   For this reason, and because Sonja Cameron is clearly the more qualified candidate for this position, I am endorsing Sonja Cameron (which I will talk more about soon.)

Written by Jacob Walker

April 10th, 2015 at 9:51 am

Virtual Onshoring has become a reality with Fiverr and other such sites. But a Virtual Onshored University will bring greater prosperity to the nation that builds it. .

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karnataka-university-statueRecently, I wrote a tad about my Open Letter to Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda, Regarding Virtual Onshoring.  I coined the concept of Virtual Onshoring in 2008, and to little surprise only 2 years later, Fiverr started. Fiverr has brought virtual onshoring into fruition, as it has been the perfect mechanism for entrepreneurs in developing nations to tap into the lucrative market of the United States and other more developed nations.

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Written by Jacob Walker

March 31st, 2015 at 11:59 am

Will Paul Kagame be the Lee Kuan Yew or Vladimir Putin of Africa?

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In 2008 as part of the SEVEN Fund Essay Competition, I wrote an Open Letter to Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda, Regarding Virtual Onshoring.  I’m unsure if he ever got or read my letter, as I didn’t win the scholarship (I will write more about this soon). But, of the many countries in Africa, Rwanda may still have the best chance of being able to quickly become a developed and prosperous nation, similar to the transformation in Singapore following Yew’s model.   But it also has the possibility of having the same downward spiral of dictatorship that Putin has wrought onto Russia.

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Written by Jacob Walker

March 29th, 2015 at 11:30 am

Posted in Political Science

The Truth about Jefferson…. He was a Politician!

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Yesterday I posted a provocative article and graphic about Thomas Jefferson, which targeted the “State of Jefferson”.  After posting this to Facebook, I had several Christian friends of mine point out some articles, including one from WallBuilder entitled “The Separation of Church and State“, and another from WND entitled “Thomas Jefferson: Deist or Christian?

And having read some of the major points within those articles, and doing some brief research into the documents they cite, I cannot say they are “outright wrong”, although the preponderance of evidence suggests that he did not believe in the supernatural portions of Christianity, and that he supported a strong separation of church and state.  So, then why is there some some evidence to the contrary?

The truth it would seem is that Jefferson and other politicians of the time (whom we call our Founding Fathers), were quite a bit like current politicians, in that they spoke out of both sides of their mouth…  When it made sense to have a treaty with Muslims, then they wrote “the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion.” But, Thomas Jefferson, like Barack Obama, probably wanted to be seen going to church.  (And yes, there is some evidence from his Notes on Religion, that he may of had some fairly orthodox views, although many other quotes suggest the opposite.)

A clearer example of hypocrisy is that when they wanted their own freedoms, they wrote “all men are created equal”. Yet, Thomas Jefferson had slaves.  (Although one of them was his mistress and evidence suggests he did not treat her as his “property”.)

But what about the “true” belief of Thomas Jefferson?  It is hard to tell.  And my guess is that he could never fully rectify his own cognitive dissonance.  But, for my Christian friends who swear we were founded as a Christian nation, evidence is as strong against that notion (for example, see the books Nature’s God & Thomas Jefferson’s Qur’an and also read about the Treaty of Tripoli) as the evidence is against a belief that Thomas Jefferson was not at all Christian.

Those interested, might also look at the Wikipedia Articles about Thomas Jefferson and Religion and the Jefferson Bible (although taking any Wikipedia article with many grains of salt!)  And also the Thomas Jefferson Encyclopedia’s article on Jefferson’s Religious Beliefs.

Written by Jacob Walker

March 12th, 2015 at 11:59 am

Posted in Political Science