Jacob J. Walker's Blog

Scholarly Thoughts, Research, and Journalism for Informal Peer Review

Archive for the ‘Learning Analytics’ Category

The Introduction/Background to my Revised Doctoral Research Proposal

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Compendium_of_Countries_LogoToday, I finished revising the first part of my doctoral research proposal, as there have been several underlying methodological and technological changes from the original proposal.  While I know doctoral research is usually not of general interest, I am still going to be posting the sections of my revised proposal as I finish them, for those who are interested.  Please feel free to ask questions if you have them, and I will do my best to explain statistical techniques or the technology, etc. that I’m talking about.

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February 20th, 2016 at 6:12 pm

My Review of the Aspen SIS from Follett based Upon a Short Demo

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Yesterday, I saw a demo of the Aspen SIS from Follett.  For full disclosure, Dylan Holcomb, the Sales Consultant who came out, was a friend of mine from high school, but honestly I wasn’t expecting it to be an SIS that we would be interested in, especially because the price tag is high for the size of school that Highlands Community Charter currently is.  But, after seeing how Aspen works, and how they addressed my blog article about the 3 features that SIS providers are missing, it is on our school’s radar as a potential. Here is a quick review of what I was impressed with, and what things I still think they could do better.

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February 18th, 2016 at 11:59 am

Three Missing Features in Most Student Information Systems (SIS)

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There is a paradox:  Humanity’s most developed organizations and systems are based upon what is learned in our education systems; yet, the field of education lags behind nearly all others.  One such area I have seen, is how feature-poor Student Information Systems (SIS) are.  Despite such systems being case studies in many database books, most of these systems do not use any data science methods to improve operations.  Specifically, I have usually not seen active security, predictive analytics, nor even resource optimization as features.  Here is why these are important to have, and my invitation for SIS providers to come into the 21st century.

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January 7th, 2016 at 9:42 am

My #EdDataSci Self-Study for 2014-2015

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With me mostly dropping the #DALMOOC course, I have been thinking about how I’m going to continue studying educational data science on my own.  And I can see I need to hone up my mathematical and statistical knowledge along with applying this knowledge to data science topics.

Since one of my major life strategies is to get “more effect for my effort” (more bang for the buck), I will be working on putting together a LearningCounts portfolio as I do my self-study, so that I can get additional college math credits.   Also, I have been finalizing my concept for my doctoral research with UNISA in the field of Comparative Education, and I will be using data science / data mining methods as the major portion of my research.  (I will share more about this in a future post)

So the following are the courses that I plan to self-study such that I can meet their learning objectives:

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October 28th, 2014 at 11:59 am

Dropping #DALMOOC ; Long Live Learning #EdDataSci

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As I posted about yesterday, I have had mixed feelings about the LINK5.10x Data, Analytics, and Learning course, (AKA DALMOOC) Now that I have had a taste of the course, I have done a quick “cost-benefit” analysis, and I am choosing to drop the class, or more specifically not finish the MOOC as I don’t want to lose the potential to pick and choose areas from the course.

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October 23rd, 2014 at 11:59 am

First Thoughts about #DALMOOC

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So I started my first week in the LINK5.10x Data, Analytics, and Learning course, with a short name of DALMOOC.  There are some things I really like about the course, and some things I don’t.

On the side of what I like, it is the concept they are trying to achieve, by letting students either have a structured or unstructured method of completing the course.

But, so far I think their execution is in beta, or possibly alpha…  In other words, while they are trying to do some interesting things, the production value is low.  Khan Academy has more interesting and learning beneficial videos, than what I’ve seen in this MOOC so far.  Which is too bad, as it is clear that there are four very knowledgeable professors teaching the subject, but the execution just isn’t there.

I am going to play around a little more with the DALMOOC ProSolo system, and may put in some of my own learning goals.  This system has potential, maybe self-learning communities could truly spring up that have a rigorous way of evaluating learning outcomes.  Now, that would be worth the price of admission…

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October 22nd, 2014 at 8:27 pm

Dive down the Data Rabbit Hole. You can go as far as you’d like, but you’ll gain something more than if you didn’t go at all.

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Take the Red Pill or the Blue Pill... Your choice!This Monday, the Data, Analytics and Learning MOOC is starting, and it is not too late to join for FREE.   I’m very interested in how this MOOC is going to work because it allows for a structured or unstructured process, which they call the “Red Pill” (unstructured) or “Blue Pill” (structured).  (Yes, it is a Matrix reference 🙂  And it sounds like it is going to encourage student contributions.  I tend to be more of self-directed learner (going on my own path), so I’m doing the Red Pill route, with probably a little bit of the structured portion also.

I think one of the advantages of this, will be that any educator will likely get value from this course, because it is likely different social groups will form for the different needs of the students.

If you want a taste of the class, there are already 2 YouTube Videos posted:

You can also find an overview of the course through its visual syllabus.

If you do join, please let me know!

Written by Jacob Walker

October 18th, 2014 at 2:41 pm